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Old 11-09-08, 05:03 PM   #21
Kirsten
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Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Scotland
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Default Re: wet room or shower cubicle

Hi, I'm an OT and I thought you might appreciate the way I would look at it.

It's much easier and cheaper to specify what you want when a property is being built. Once the property is built and the fittings are in, it's more expensive, time-consuming and disruptive to rip things out and re-do them, and it's very inconvenient having bathroom work done, so you want to get things right first time if you can, bearing in mind that your needs now probably won't be the same as your needs in a year or 5 years' time.

A wet-room or a level access shower is more likely to be suitable for long term needs than a shower cubicle. Shower cubicles are quite restrictive, even the larger ones, and anything with a step into it is going to be a problem for someone with mobility difficulties. Shower cubicles have limited space for carers to assist. If there is already a bath in place, it is possible to replace the bath with a shower tray which takes up more or less the same floor area as the bath did, and these can be fitted so as to be reasonably flush with the floor. Alternatively, the bath can be taken out and the whole floor re-shaped to form a slight fall towards the drain, a non-slip floor coating applied (try googling Altro flooring for an idea of what's most commonly used) and a shower installed in a suitable position. The benefit of a wet-floor is that it will be accessible in the long term no matter how a person's needs change. It's suitable for people who are still mobile, there are no space concerns for wall-mounted or free standing shower seats, and the larger, wheelchair-type shower seats can be wheeled in and out and positioned without too much difficulty.

The most common problem with installing showers is drainage in a room with a concrete floor. If the room has floorboards, the shower drain can be sunk into the floorboards and gravity will take the waste water away. If you have a concrete floor, the contractor either has to dig it out to get the drain in, or he will add more to the floor and fit the drain into it, but then you end up with a step at the doorway as the whole floor is higher, or he'll have to fit a waste pump, and they tend to be noisy and they do break down.

Wet-rooms for disability adaptations are not the slippery marble things you see in glossy brochures or hot countries. They have non-slip flooring and are designed to be safe, not treacherous underfoot!

Most OTs are likely to recommend a wet-floor or level access rather than a cubicle because we have a duty to think about long-term needs, and to ensure public money is used cost-effectively. We're not going to recommend spending several thousand pounds on a cubicle if we can reasonably predict that three or four years later we'll have to spend another couple of thousand pounds ripping out the cubicle and putting in a level-access. We'd rather do it right the first time. And in the case of council or housing association properties, it's easier to re-let a property with a wet-floor than a cubicle because it will be accessible for more people.

Hope that's helpful! Good luck, whatever you decide.
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Old 11-09-08, 10:23 PM   #22
twamoons
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Default Re: wet room or shower cubicle

Hi Kirsten,

Thanks for your reply, it was very helpful, I can see what you mean by getting things right in the first place, if that is the case, then I reckon we will not be moving into the house we were looking at, it is a new build and too far on for a wet room, they are finishing off the inside and the pipes, drains and things are already in place, back to the drawing board I suppose, I'll keep your information to hand,

Thanks again,

Carole
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Old 12-09-08, 09:41 AM   #23
Kirsten
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Default Re: wet room or shower cubicle

It might not be too late - assuming the layout is right, it should be possible to lay an appropriate floor and fit a shower. It'll be more expensive if they've already fitted the bath and done the tiling, but it should be possible, and at least if it's new, you can easily get tiles to match to replace where the bath used to be. Have a word with them and see what they say.
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Old 12-09-08, 09:23 PM   #24
twamoons
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Default Re: wet room or shower cubicle

Hi Kirsten,

Probably fingers crossed time, apart from looking at this house, we are also waiting for an OT to come and advise us, 3 weeks and counting, lol, I'm ever hopeful,

Carole
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Old 12-03-09, 05:50 PM   #25
CJ
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Default Re: wet room or shower cubicle

Hi everyone

I am pleased to say that our adaption is now complete.

A down stairs bedroom and on suite wet room.

Thank you for your advice with some of the kit.

Items we have included and are proving helpful are;

PIR light switches for the hall and wet room

underfloor heating for the wet room and bedroom

a clos o mat automatic toilet

and a body drier

bye for now
regards from
CJ
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Old 14-03-09, 07:11 PM   #26
kayleigh
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Location: leyland lancashire
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Default Re: wet room or shower cubicle

hiya i dont really like the sound of a wetroom either but its up to you!
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Old 16-03-09, 01:58 PM   #27
Worrier
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Default Re: wet room or shower cubicle

The flat where my MIL lives already had a wet room when she moved in. The bath had been taken out and special non-slip flooring laid. This was ideal for my MIL as she was used to having showers in a shower cubicle in her previous home. Having a wet room is a lot safer for her as she has nothing to climb or trip over and she can sit on a shower stool to keep her balance. However, it may prove to be less than ideal when she needs an agency carer to help her shower, as it will be difficult for the carer not to get wet as well. I suppose the carer would have to quickly lather up my MIL with a sponge and bucket and then hose her down with the shower, but I think she will get rather cold. It's a shame that underfloor heating couldn't have been fitted, as my MIL likes to stand on a bathmat to get dry but it's a trip hazard.
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